Accomplishing a goal is not completely based on surpassing the percentages like most writers never meet with publishing a book. Accomplishing and reaching goals means fulfilling your own expectations with your work and desires, both personally and as a writer. This, of course, all starts with realistic book expectations, and not some over-hyped fantasy.

How Do I Craft Realistic Book Expectations?

The entire process begins with a writer’s realization of actual real-world scenarios and goalkeeping. In order to reach a goal, that goal needs to be ultra-realistic, but not in the traditional order of making goals. It doesn’t, and shouldn’t, need to be a goal that isn’t challenging or avoids the out of the average approach. It should be surprisingly unrealistic but not overdone in the same fashion.

Begin this process by asking yourself, “How can I reach this goal?”. This set of goals might be a personally rewarding one of writing a certain quota of words each day, or maybe it’s professionally minded of getting an overwhelming amount of pre-orders. You then need to follow-up to your goal and set actionable deliverables. These deliverables are where you should approach it with an out of the mold outlook, don’t look at other writers and publishing cases. Crash through the average mold of writing and publishing, and set a deliverable that will surprise and excite your readers in ways that nobody else has before.

With these three questions and setups of outlook into your goals, deliverables, and audience you will have a realistic expectation. Not only will you have a realistic expectation, but your expectations will exceed all your doubts and roadblocks previously holding you and your brand behind.

Knowing When You’re Moving Forward

With all goals, it’s most powerful and engaging when we can identify when and where we are moving forward, and where we are falling behind. For identifying this and constantly reminding myself for this in addition to many other facets of my professional work, is to begin when you are not yet ready.

Following the mindset of beginning when you are not yet ready as a whole, allows you to step out of your comfort zone, as well as just start creating, writing, and delivering without needing to plan or prepare. The preparation mindset is often found a nuisance to hold people back from reaching goals, setting real expectations, and moving forward with their work.

With this in mind, I always try to go back to the core values in what I’m working to create and the end creative result of delivering. Focusing on the result of delivering, you are focusing on delivering the valuable creation to your audience. Focus on providing a value-centered community around your topic. Keep creating goals with expectations without needing to prepare first, and begin when you’re not yet ready.